Ramblings Of A Mad Arkansan

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im-bravo:

Almond from Cucumber Quest. This is my last request. 8’D I might have ended up watching some of the dubs on youtube because its such a funny and cute story ahah. I love it. plus shes a bunny c: I hope you like it!

im-bravo:

Almond from Cucumber Quest. This is my last request. 8’D I might have ended up watching some of the dubs on youtube because its such a funny and cute story ahah. I love it. plus shes a bunny c: I hope you like it!

ryanlangdraws:

Demona. Took a little break, but I’m getting back into it.

ryanlangdraws:

Demona. Took a little break, but I’m getting back into it.

ancientart:

Cave 19 at the Ajanta Caves, Maharashtra, India.

Ajanta contains 30 excavated rock-cut caves which belong to two distinct phases of Buddhism: the Hinayana phase (2nd century BC-1st century AD) and the Mahayana phase (5th century AD-6th century AD). These caves are considered to be one the finest examples of early Buddhist architecture, cave-paintings, and sculpture.

The Archaeological Survey of India, Aurangabad Circle, speaks specifically of Cave 19:

The small chityagriha [prayer hall] is considered one of the most perfect specimens of Buddhist art in India. The exquisitely decorated facade and beautiful interior form a grand combination of richness of detail and graceful proportion. The inscription in Cave 17 records that a feudatory prince under Vakataka King Harisena was a munificent donor of this cave, datable to the 5th century AD. It consists of a small but elegant portico, verandah, a hall, and chapels. The apsidal hall is divided into a nave, an elaborate and elongated drum, and a globular dome which stands against the apse. 

The pillars and the stupa are intricately carved with the figures of Lord Buddha and other decorative motifs. The sidewalls are also adorned with countless figures of Buddha while the ceiling is filled with painted floral motifs in which animals, birds, and human figures are cleverly interwoven. The chapel contains the panel of Nagaraja with his consort known for its serenity and royal dignity.

The first and second photos were taken by Kirk Kittell, the third is by Arian Zwegers.

professorsugoi:

the-bored-cat:

What does kindness get you? This.

image


From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Green Flash Turning BluePhotographer: Laurent Lavender; Summary Authors: Laurent Laveder, Jim Foster
This photo sequence shows a green flash (second and third photos) and blue flash (fourth and fifth photos) observed at sunset near the Mont Saint-Michel, France. The weather had been fair for several days as northwestern France was under the influence of a large anticyclone. When I noticed a mock mirage atop the Sun, I realized that the green flash might follow and was thus prepared to photograph it. If sunlight is refracted through a strong thermal gradient above the surface, a mock mirage may form. However, only when there’s a marked vertical magnification of the mock image of the Sun (or in some cases multiple images) will color separation produced by differential refraction be visible to the eye or camera — green and sometimes blue colors. The five photos of this sequence were snapped in about 3 seconds. Always protect your eyes when looking toward the Sun, even when the Sun is low in the sky. Sequence taken on March 15, 2014.

From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Green Flash Turning Blue
Photographer: Laurent Lavender; Summary Authors: Laurent Laveder, Jim Foster

This photo sequence shows a green flash (second and third photos) and blue flash (fourth and fifth photos) observed at sunset near the Mont Saint-Michel, France. The weather had been fair for several days as northwestern France was under the influence of a large anticyclone. When I noticed a mock mirage atop the Sun, I realized that the green flash might follow and was thus prepared to photograph it. If sunlight is refracted through a strong thermal gradient above the surface, a mock mirage may form. However, only when there’s a marked vertical magnification of the mock image of the Sun (or in some cases multiple images) will color separation produced by differential refraction be visible to the eye or camera — green and sometimes blue colors. The five photos of this sequence were snapped in about 3 seconds. Always protect your eyes when looking toward the Sun, even when the Sun is low in the sky. Sequence taken on March 15, 2014.


From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Five views of a shell of the Giant Tun (Tonna galea), a species of marine gastropod mollusc in the family Tonnidae. The shell is very large, with an average height of 6 inches (150 mm), but thin and inflated (though relatively durable); as such, the shell weighs considerably less than most other gastropod shells of similar size.
From left to right: dorsal, lateral (right side), ventral, back, and front view.
Photograph: H. Zell; edit: Heinrich Pniok

From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Five views of a shell of the Giant Tun (Tonna galea), a species of marine gastropod mollusc in the family Tonnidae. The shell is very large, with an average height of 6 inches (150 mm), but thin and inflated (though relatively durable); as such, the shell weighs considerably less than most other gastropod shells of similar size.

From left to right: dorsal, lateral (right side), ventral, back, and front view.

Photograph: H. Zell; edit: Heinrich Pniok


From Audubon Magazine Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Ruff (Philomachus pugnax)
During a day of hiking and photography on the tundra in Barrow, Alaska, Georges McNeil and a group of birders happened upon this ruff. When the day got colder and rainy, the group decided to pack it in, settling for some “bad photos” of the bird before they left. The next day, however, the last one of the trip, McNeil and the group returned to the place where they had spotted the ruff. It was still there. Although the bird kept its distance, McNeil stayed patient. The lighting was better this time and the group eventually managed a number of great shots. “What a lucky find and a great way to end our trip,” McNeil says. “It was a life bird for me, and to see a breeding male was incredible! That is one of the wonders of Barrow: You never know what you will run across.”
By Todd Petty; Published: 04/14/2014

From Audubon Magazine Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Ruff (Philomachus pugnax)

During a day of hiking and photography on the tundra in Barrow, Alaska, Georges McNeil and a group of birders happened upon this ruff. When the day got colder and rainy, the group decided to pack it in, settling for some “bad photos” of the bird before they left. The next day, however, the last one of the trip, McNeil and the group returned to the place where they had spotted the ruff. It was still there. Although the bird kept its distance, McNeil stayed patient. The lighting was better this time and the group eventually managed a number of great shots. “What a lucky find and a great way to end our trip,” McNeil says. “It was a life bird for me, and to see a breeding male was incredible! That is one of the wonders of Barrow: You never know what you will run across.”

By Todd Petty; Published: 04/14/2014


From Smithsonian Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Sulfur miner working in the Ijen Caldera of Indonesia
Photography by Agung Bawono Aji, Jakarta, Indonesia

From Smithsonian Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Sulfur miner working in the Ijen Caldera of Indonesia

Photography by Agung Bawono Aji, Jakarta, Indonesia


From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Two Different Lives Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot
"I was traveling between the European and Asian sides of Istanbul, Turkey, by ferry,” says Your Shot contributor Merve Ates. “I was sitting on seats outside, accompanied on my journey by seagulls. The boy on the right was sitting next to me. I was listening to the screaming of the seagulls and smelling the sea air and taking several shots but also waiting for a particularly interesting moment, and suddenly I noticed the window reflection. It seemed like the man and the boy were sitting side by side. In reality, the old man was reading the  Koran, while the young boy had a worried look on his face (maybe about his future—who knows?). Two separate lives, together in the same frame.”
This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Two Different Lives Merve Ates, National Geographic Your Shot

"I was traveling between the European and Asian sides of Istanbul, Turkey, by ferry,” says Your Shot contributor Merve Ates. “I was sitting on seats outside, accompanied on my journey by seagulls. The boy on the right was sitting next to me. I was listening to the screaming of the seagulls and smelling the sea air and taking several shots but also waiting for a particularly interesting moment, and suddenly I noticed the window reflection. It seemed like the man and the boy were sitting side by side. In reality, the old man was reading the Koran, while the young boy had a worried look on his face (maybe about his future—who knows?). Two separate lives, together in the same frame.”

This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:
Mammatus Clouds over NebraskaJorn Olsen Photography
When do cloud bottoms appear like bubbles? Normally, cloud bottoms are flat. This is because moist warm air that rises and cools will condense into water droplets at a specific temperature, which usually corresponds to a very specific height. As water droplets grow, an opaque cloud forms. Under some conditions, however, cloud pockets can develop that contain large droplets of water or ice that fall into clear air as they evaporate. Such pockets may occur in turbulent air near a thunderstorm. Resulting mammatus clouds can appear especially dramatic if sunlit from the side. The mammatus clouds pictured above were photographed over Hastings, Nebraska during 2004 June.

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; April 15, 2014:

Mammatus Clouds over Nebraska
Jorn Olsen Photography

When do cloud bottoms appear like bubbles? Normally, cloud bottoms are flat. This is because moist warm air that rises and cools will condense into water droplets at a specific temperature, which usually corresponds to a very specific height. As water droplets grow, an opaque cloud forms. Under some conditions, however, cloud pockets can develop that contain large droplets of water or ice that fall into clear air as they evaporate. Such pockets may occur in turbulent air near a thunderstorm. Resulting mammatus clouds can appear especially dramatic if sunlit from the side. The mammatus clouds pictured above were photographed over Hastings, Nebraska during 2004 June.

standardwhore:

if you dont like cats, consider this:

ur wrong

orbitalencounters:

Total lunar eclipse for the Americas on April 14th 15th 2014

orbitalencounters:

Total lunar eclipse for the Americas on April 14th 15th 2014

Sat outside in the cold for about twenty minutes watching the moon turn red.

Also heard what I think was a Long-Eared Owl in the distance.

pantslesswrock:

supermariomothers:

gaycave:

nothingbutpokemon:

Artist ~ Chronokhalil

YOOOOOOOOOOO

honestly these are all awesome i just wish their names were more compatible

dude kadactyl is fucking raw

huffingtonpost:

Everything you need to know about checking the four upcoming lunar eclipses here.