Ramblings Of A Mad Arkansan

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hadesleprechaun:

Godzilla - Our best looks so far

foodffs:

Polenta Skillet Eggs with Chorizo

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Variscite - Little Green Monster Mine, Utah

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Variscite - Little Green Monster Mine, Utah

(Source: fineart.ha.com)

anightvaleintern:

Rat Queens Issues 1 & 2 - Highlights

Written by Kurtis J Wiebe

Purchase Rat Queens on Comixology

I was kind of just wondering why Tumblr isn’t talking about this fabulously crude comic about awesome ladies.

heathersketcheroos:

Blerp

heathersketcheroos:

Blerp

heathersketcheroos:

Nyerrr

heathersketcheroos:

Nyerrr

Carne Asada Fries

Carne Asada Fries


From Audubon Magazine Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis)
This photo featuring a sandhill crane chick and its mother, beak to beak, was taken in Melbourne, Florida. The mother had nested in a small pond in an industrial area, says Ursula Dubrick, who spent weeks observing and photographing the nest, unsure when the chick would hatch. Since Dubrick lived nearby, she visited the pond twice a day, spending several hours each time. One morning she noticed a small hole in the egg; the chick emerged later that day. Dubrick continued to photograph the cranes in the days that followed, observing the parents as they took the chick for walks away from the nest. One cold morning, when the chick was four days old, the mother was keeping it warm in her feathers. Dubrick was there to the capture the moment when the chick emerged and locked eyes with its mother. “It turned out to be a very precious photo,” says Dubrick, “and one of my favorite images.”
By Todd Petty; Published: 04/23/2014

From Audubon Magazine Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis)

This photo featuring a sandhill crane chick and its mother, beak to beak, was taken in Melbourne, Florida. The mother had nested in a small pond in an industrial area, says Ursula Dubrick, who spent weeks observing and photographing the nest, unsure when the chick would hatch. Since Dubrick lived nearby, she visited the pond twice a day, spending several hours each time. One morning she noticed a small hole in the egg; the chick emerged later that day. Dubrick continued to photograph the cranes in the days that followed, observing the parents as they took the chick for walks away from the nest. One cold morning, when the chick was four days old, the mother was keeping it warm in her feathers. Dubrick was there to the capture the moment when the chick emerged and locked eyes with its mother. “It turned out to be a very precious photo,” says Dubrick, “and one of my favorite images.”

By Todd Petty; Published: 04/23/2014


From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
Ice SkirtsPhotographer: Ken Scott; Summary Authors: Ken Scott; Jim Foster
The photomontage above shows the aftermath of flooding in the wetlands near where I live in northern Michigan's Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. It was taken on April 14, 2014. Approximately two inches (50 mm) of rain fell onto the snowpack during the preceding two days, leading to local flooding. The water receded quickly in concert with plunging temperatures, but before doing so froze, leaving these curious ice skirts — right center and right bottom photos. The temperature dropped to about 14 F or -10 C overnight, after the rain had ended. However, only the surface, highest water level and coldest layer, of the flood waters froze over.

From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Ice Skirts
Photographer: Ken Scott; Summary Authors: Ken Scott; Jim Foster

The photomontage above shows the aftermath of flooding in the wetlands near where I live in northern Michigan's Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. It was taken on April 14, 2014. Approximately two inches (50 mm) of rain fell onto the snowpack during the preceding two days, leading to local flooding. The water receded quickly in concert with plunging temperatures, but before doing so froze, leaving these curious ice skirts — right center and right bottom photos. The temperature dropped to about 14 F or -10 C overnight, after the rain had ended. However, only the surface, highest water level and coldest layer, of the flood waters froze over.


From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks is an oil on canvas painting completed by Ilya Repin from 1880 to 1891. It depicts Cossacks of the Zaporozhian Host writing a reply filled with vulgarities and invectives to an ultimatum from Turkish Sultan Mehmed IV. The 203 cm × 358 cm (80 in × 141 in) work is now held at the Russian Museum in Saint Petersburg.
Painting: Ilya Repin

From Wikipedia Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks is an oil on canvas painting completed by Ilya Repin from 1880 to 1891. It depicts Cossacks of the Zaporozhian Host writing a reply filled with vulgarities and invectives to an ultimatum from Turkish Sultan Mehmed IV. The 203 cm × 358 cm (80 in × 141 in) work is now held at the Russian Museum in Saint Petersburg.

Painting: Ilya Repin


From Smithsonian Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) on the prowl after a Chital (Axis axis) at the Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project in Maharashtra, India
Photography by Porus Khareghat, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

From Smithsonian Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) on the prowl after a Chital (Axis axis) at the Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project in Maharashtra, India

Photography by Porus Khareghat, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India


From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
Rock of Ages Nicholas Roemmelt
After a heavy thunderstorm, a small pond grants a mirror reflection of a hiker at the Wave, the most famous landform in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona and Utah. Says Nicholas Roemmelt, who submitted this picture to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, it was “a calm and solemn place on a perfect day.”
This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.

From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Rock of Ages Nicholas Roemmelt

After a heavy thunderstorm, a small pond grants a mirror reflection of a hiker at the Wave, the most famous landform in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona and Utah. Says Nicholas Roemmelt, who submitted this picture to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, it was “a calm and solemn place on a perfect day.”

This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:
 Arp 81: 100 Million Years LaterHubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing : Martin Pugh
From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in the sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data.

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; April 23, 2014:

Arp 81: 100 Million Years Later
Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing : Martin Pugh

From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in the sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data.

(Source: pixiv.net)

Fun video: What if the Moon orbited the Earth at the same general distance as the International Space Station - about 420km up.